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20130201
20130228
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. we are reading about a $3 billion cut in the military health care system. the pentagon could be restructuring contracts. what do you want to say about those areas? guest: training is going to be cut. dod has said only unit preparing to deploy will be training. everybody else in the air force and navy, the planes will be grounded. they will take the money they would have used to do the training and shifted into the war account to pay for afghanistan. try care -- tricare is what you mentioned. people will still get benefits can be seen by doctors. host: a big fight in washington over the defense aspect. what else should we know about the defense area? guest: there will be an impact. there are two sides of sequestration. there is the side that we need to cut federal spending and defense needs to play a role. talking to people in the pentagon, a lot of them would agree with that. the problem is they are halfway through the year. they have not been preparing for this at all. they will have to squeeze all of these cuts into a six-month period. the next six months, it is implemented
federal government except the pentagon. all of a sudden the last couple of months hitting this arbitrary political target is vital. what is vital, as i said, is having a deficit strategy that's consistent with sound economic growth and making sure that we strengthen the middle class and that means as a first step to make sure that our deficits, as the economy improves, as we grow, that our deficits are not growing faster than g.d.p. and that we stabilize the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. because if you don't, as the economy improves, higher government borrowing -- we need to adopt that strategy and adopt it now. have it kicked in over a period of time. we just got very good news that the rate of per capita increase in health care costs is actually at the lowest level of 50 years. we need to continue to adopt strategies to keep that -- those costs increase low. as as demographic changes means baby boomers retire and we clearly need to keep working on those issues. but let me just sum up where we are in terms of our deficit reduction targets. over the last little over two years we have no
from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, and i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate they need as the nation emerges from more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another jesuit institution, santa clara uni
. as is widely recognized, sequestration over the next 10 years apply to the pentagon budget would only reduce it in inflation adjusted terms to what it was in 2007 a. the most powerful military in the world -- 2007, as the most powerful military in the world engaged in a war in iraq and the challenge in afghanistan. if members of congress pay attention to the facts, they will see a clear path to dramatically reduce pentagon spending without undermining america's position as being the most powerful nation on the planet. and nobody has done a better job of highlighting a path forward, an area of opportunity, than walter pinkus writhing on the pages of the "washington post" over the last couple years as he details the sweep of our nuclear weapons program and the spending trajectory. this morning's latest offering should be required reading for every member of congress and the ones who whine the loutest should be forced to read it -- loudest should be forced to read it twice. he details a vast array of nuclear weapons already deployed, ready to be deployed within 30 minutes, a relic of our conten
is astounding. the pentagon needs to be pared down. me the pentagon to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for times. -- the pentagon needs to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for times. you agree with this general perception that senator hagel -- chuck hagel made. that would be great. >> that is a good question. it is a fair question. i cannot speak for senator hagel. my interpretation is that it is along the lines of something that secretary gates used to say. we had accumulated over the decade post 9/11 when our budget was going up every year. when your budget goes year and year out, it is fair to say we have a management problem, all of our managers, it was easy to reach for more money to solve your managing problem, whether it is a technical problem in a program or something like that. it was noticeable to me that the logistics in some places that have accumulated over the decades. that is my secretary gates started his efficiency initiative, which i was part of. our efforts to reform the system improved our performance. in parallel, we have absorbed billions
that there is any role for the government beyond providing for defense and funding the pentagon. that is the view of some. it is not the view of the great majority of the american people. i think the president will propose -- nobody knows what the president will say -- i think he will propose lots of ideas about how we can support them -- to spur innovation in this country. the government has had an important role in basic research. i mentioned the national institutes of health. you have other agencies, in the energy sector or other sectors, that can help provide seed money for those sorts of things. host: the ranking democrat on the house budget committee, representative chris van hollen, our guest on a newsmakers. the "usa today" put it in one word, jobs. this is available online at usatoday.com. a point from joseph ramirez -- from inside "the new york times ," there is this -- a couple of other details from this piece -- from the body of this story -- two other points, first on the issue of immigration, the president will say that he intends to make good on his promised to revamp the nation's
, the president traveling to norfolk, virginia, an area have the with pentagon contracts and military construction and the navy shipyards. what are you looking for? guest: the most interesting things will be the votes in the house and senate. if democrats are able to win over a number of republicans to get a compromise through, that would really upset the equation. it would be very much unexpected. that is maybe our one chance to avert the sequester. more likely, it will be a vote were democrats -- where democrats put forward a plan but fails. then you'll see a lot of finger- pointing from both sides, with republican saying, democrats could not pass of planned. the democrats will say, republicans are the ones who blocked our compromise to be in the senate. -- plan in the senate. there'll be a lot of blame shifting. it will be interesting to see the one side or the other is able to garner a political advantage. host: justin sink from the hill newspaper. week untiling -- one sequestration -- will it matter? federal agencies to have some win room -- some siggle room -- wiggle room. -- in the "usa tod
was the police chief in arlington, virginia. that is where the pentagon was. what i learned that day is if this country >> now i wondered in the last decade how many people have to get murdered in a mass murder for it to be enough? i've been wrong time after time after time. i'm a grand pap i have little kids at home. are 20 babies be enough. that's what we're asking for? when was that gun bought? [applause] >> i'm a law enforcement guy too. i had your job in connecticut some years ago. i want to say, nobody in law enforcement ever thinks we're doing enough. nobody ever says we can go home and stop trying to to do better. so as much as we may agree with you that the united states department of justice and local and state police forces are trying to enforce these laws as agress ily as possible. i think you need more resources and you need criminal background checks. so you can know how to keep these weapons, all weapons out of the hands who shouldn't have them, criminals, domestic abusers, the severe mentally ill. would you agree that the criminal background check expansion into priva
, a cut in naval forces. at $3 billion cut in the military's health care system. the pentagon could be restructuring contracts. what do you want to say about those areas? guest: training is of cuts where only units preparing to deploy or other places -- these are the ones that will be training. everyone else, primarily in the air force and the navy, their planes will be grounded because it will not have the money they would use to do the training. it will be shifted into the war accounts to pay for afghanistan. stuff like tricare, i believe you mentioned, that is more like the benefits for care and being seen by doctors and whatnot. >> there are lots of voices in washington. what should we know about the defensive area? guest: there are two sides. there is the side that says we need to cut federal spending and the defense needs to take a roll. a lot of them would agree with that. the problem is, we're halfway done with the year and they have not been preparing for this. they will up to squeeze this into a six-month period. if it is fully implemented, it will have an impact. 2014, if
of improving efficiency within the pentagon. i would say that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is focused on readiness and training, which is absolutely true. if you talk to the lawyers that work with the defense contractors, they think they will have a field day care and some had testimony last year that the legal hassles emanating from sequestration may eat up a lot of their savings. but beyond that, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. and what we do is try to develop capability to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can prepare for future contingencies. the point is that it does not just readiness. it hurts us in the real world today. there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration's savings for other more targeted savings so that you save this amount of money, you're still fiscally responsible, but you don't get defense and these domestic p
: from the washington times, "the biggest losers." "the pentagon estimates the states will lose a total of $ 4.8 billion in workers salaries when its civilian employees are laid off or forced to take unpaid time off because of budget constraints. california, $62,500. maryland, $45,700. this is the lost of wages -- the loss of wages for each of those states. california, $419 million, etc. sandra, good morning, you are on "washington journal." caller caller: good morning. we all had better go out and billson there's -- and build some bears. we are not getting anything to help us in any way. but on top of that, we should all have girlfriends on the side, and washington is going to hell in a handbasket. when are they going to grow up and be men and women, decent human beings, and do something right for this world? shame on you. host: do you think washington is any different now than it has been in the past? caller: i think we are wide open to what they are doing. this has evidently gone on for a long time and they can get away with anything they want. why? they can't. we can't. can you? you
for the director of intelligence or the defense intelligence agency? and that is part of the pentagon? caller: the defense intelligence agency, we are under the dod. host: what are you hearing about your job? caller: because i am a civilian, i'm liable to be placed on furlough at least one day a week, potentially 22 days until the end of the fiscal year. unfortunately, paying my half of the rent with a roommate at $1,200 a month prior to facilities, i'm going to have many difficulties with living with another analyst, just trying to afford our rent, as well as part of any food or any other expenses. host: could you have taken a job in the private sector and made more? caller: absolutely. i got a college degree try to join the intelligence agency, because i intended to serve this country. i do not wear a uniform, but i go to work every day for the defense of this nation. host: steve, from maryland, part of the energy department. caller: i am a fairly senior person. i understand the plight of folks at lower levels. the point is i have been working for the federal government for about 32 years.
and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overs
and to the pentagon which this grant came from. we cannot abandon our soldiers who have served us well, and i would hope that the grant for this hospital will be continued because texas has been known to have the largest number of returning iraq and afghanistan troops. . that speaks loudly to the question of sequester, and i'm delighted to the president last evening could not have offered more olive branches on economic reform, tax reform, the idea that we can do this budget together. not a sequester, not a self-inflicted wound. it's what we did to ourselves. but more importantly to talk about innovation and growth. something that i have spoken about over and over again as a member formerly of the science committee and now homeland security. where is america's genius? right outside the beltway. why are we dividing ourselves along democrats and republicans refusing to put revenue alongside of cuts? mr. speaker, we are at the bone almost. and sequester that is across-the-board cuts will literally destroy us and put us in a recession. all the talking heads that are suggesting that the president was no
, fraud and abuse going on at the pentagon. i can't for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need them to have an audit to know where our tax dollars are going and set priorities. let me ask you about the c.b.o. report on the american recovery and investment act. i would like to ask you, mr. director, can you explain how our government's targeted investment and the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure, how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy. and also if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits and social services that listed the long-term economic stability and incomes, say half the families living in poverty, what impact would that have overall in terms of our economic growth? >> as you know, we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances that the country faced, increased output and jobs relative to what would have happened in the absence
. the president following -- traveling to newport, virginia, an area happy with pentagon contracts, military construction, and the navy shipyard. what are you looking for? guest: the most interesting thing will be debates in the senate. if democrats are able to win over enough republicans to get a compromise deal through, that will really upset the equation. it would be very much unexpected. but that is maybe our one chance to offer the sequester at this point. more likely, it will be a vote where democrats put a plan forward, it cannot garner enough republican support, and it fails. a republican plan is put forward and also does not pass. the democrats control the senate. then, republicans will say the democrats could not pass a plan. the democrats will say, republicans have one to do what? they blocked a compromise plan in the senate. there will be a lot of finger- pointing, a lot of gamesmanship. it will be interesting to see if one side or the other is able to garner a political advantage. host: justin sink, who is following this story for "the hill" newspaper. >> here is a look at our
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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